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Video Transcript

[LAUGHTER]

Haley
Nice one.
Oh, hey! Come on in. You got here just in time to keep Rob from shooting all the big game.
Rob
Look. We needed all the practice on targets to know how our bows shoot. But knowing where to place that lethal shot—that is the final key to success. Now why don't you give it a try? We'll see how you do.
Haley
You'll like this.
Rob
Come on.
All right. Here comes a deer. Now that's a tempting shot, right? Looks plenty close. So what are you going to do—shoot or don't shoot?

[NO DIALOG WHILE TIMER COUNTS DOWN]

Rob
Good choice. As tempting as the frontal shot looks, it's a bad shot. See all those bones protecting the vitals? There's way too much bone and muscle that could stop or deflect the broadhead. Plus, look at the other deer that is standing right behind this one.
End result—a wounded animal and a ruined hunt. Try again.
Scenario Two
Ah, here comes a monster. Now what do you do—shoot or don't shoot?

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Rob
Most bowhunters might see this huge animal and think that you can't possibly miss. In reality, this is a bad angle to try to hit the vital zone, which is the heart and lungs. There are just way too many bones and large muscles in the way—not a good shot.
Haley
So knowing where it is and how to get your arrow into it cleanly makes all the difference between a wounded or lost animal and a recovered one. Let's look at another.
Rob
Scenario Three
Ooh, look. It's broadside and within range. Try to track it with your sight. OK, it's moving. Shoot or don't shoot?

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Rob
Good choice. Moving game, brush in the way, not being able to settle into a good sight-in picture are all great reasons to not try a risky shot.
Scenario Four
OK, on biggies like this, a broadside shot is your high confidence angle. Let's see how you do. Shoot or don't shoot?

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Rob
Way to go! Your freezer's full now. Besides envisioning where to shoot, anticipating when to shoot will boost your success. You waited for the leg to go forward, offering a clear, vital zone to both lungs. Good work. But keep in mind that if you were in an elevated stand, your arrow can sometimes go high. That shoulder blade's going to stop your arrow. So broadside isn't the money shot all the time.
Scenario Five
Hey, here comes another one. Shoot or don't shoot?

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Rob
No, not much you can do there, except enjoy the encounter. Quartering-on like that or a rear-end shot simply aren't ethical shots.
You scored a lot higher as a bowhunter by letting those shot angles pass.
All right. Let's try another one.
Scenario Six
Shoot or don't shoot?

[NO DIALOG WHILE TIMER COUNTS DOWN]

Rob
That quartering-away shot increases your chance for success. Here's why. See how rotating the deer from broadside to quartering-away actually increases the size of the vital zone. Shooting for the offside front leg, that vital zone is not only bigger, it also shifts those shoulder blades out of the way. And even if the deer moves during the shot, you're still in the kill zone. Pa-ching!
Haley
Nice work! But remember, sometimes not taking any shot at all is the best decision you can make.
Rob
Look. Being ethical and responsible in your shot placement just has all kinds of rewards.
You want to try?
Haley
Yeah. Move over.