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Primitive hunting arms include the muzzleloader firearm, the bow and arrow, and the crossbow.

Muzzleloaders

Hunter education course review and summary

Muzzleloaders are loaded from the muzzle or open end of the gun. They have a lock instead of the action. Muzzleloaders are usually rifles but can be shotguns (single barrel or double barrel) or handguns (pistols or revolvers).


Hunter education course review and summary

Another type of muzzleloading firearm is the in-line muzzleloader. Its parts are recoil pad, striker safety, trigger safety, breech, scope mounts, rear sight, front sight, ramrod, and stock.


Hunter education course review and summary

Only use black powder or a synthetic black powder substitute in muzzleloaders. Do not use modern-day smokeless powders due to the risk of serious injury.

The four sizes or granulations of black powder are Fg, FFg, FFFg, and FFFFg.


Hunter education course review and summary

The three types of projectiles used in muzzleloaders are the round ball, the bullet, and shot. Select your ammunition based on the type of shooting you plan to do.


Hunter education course review and summary

To protect yourself from the increased risks of using a muzzleloader, remember to follow safety rules when loading or unloading your firearm. The primary rule is to keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction. Do not lean over, stand in front of, or blow down the muzzle.


Hunter education course review and summary

You should swab the barrel of your muzzleloader with a moist patch after each shot to avoid fouling. Then thoroughly clean the muzzleloader after each shooting session.